eXtension Articles,News,Faqs- bee health

  1. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: Rounding Out the Year

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    Honey Bees and Beekeeping 7.1: Overwintering hives Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Honey Bees and Beekeeping 7.2: Overwintering and one story hives Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Honey Bees and Beekeeping 7.3: Second season management Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Honey Bees and Beekeeping 7.4: Fall management Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

  2. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: Its Harvest Time

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    • Extracting honey
    • Packaging and selling honey
    • Commercial honey processing

    Its Harvest Time: Section 6.1: Its Harvest Time Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Its Harvest Time: Section 6.2: Extracting honey Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Its Harvest Time: Section 6.3: Packaging and selling honey Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Its Harvest Time: Section 6.4: Commercial honey processing Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

  3. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: Diseases and Pests

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    • Chalbrood, sacbrood, moths, tracheal mites
    • Varroa mites and quenlessness

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    • Diseases and pests
    • Chalbrood, sacbrood, moths, tracheal mites
    • Varroa mites and quenlessness

    Diseases and Pests: Section 5.1: Diseases and pests Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Diseases and Pests: Section 5.2: Chalkbrood, sacbrood, moths, tracheal mites Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    Diseases and Pests: Section 5.3: Varroa mites and queenlessness Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

  4. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: A Mid-season Break

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    In the Beginning: Section 4.1: Requeening Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    In the Beginning: Section 4.2: Queen rearing Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

    In the Beginning: Section 4.3: Package production, beekeeping associations Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

  5. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: Things are Buzzing

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    • Things are buzzin
    • The brood nest
    • Our growing hives
    • Migrating our hives

     

    In the Beginning: Section 3.1: Things are buzzin Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

    In the Beginning: Section 3.2: The brood nest Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

    In the Beginning: Section 3.3: Our growing hives Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

    In the Beginning: Section 3.4: Migrating our hives Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

  6. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: In the Beginning

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

     

    In the Beginning: Section 2.1: Bee Biology and Equipment Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

    In the Beginning: Section 2.2: Receiving and Installing Bees Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

    In the Beginning: Section 2.3: Releasing Queens Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040.

     

  7. Honey Bees and Beekeeping: A Year in the Life of an Apiary
    This online video walks you through one year of managing honey bee colonies.

     

     

    Menu


    Part I

    1. Introduction:

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

    2. In the Beginning

    • Receiving and Installing Bees
    • Medication
    • Releasing Queens

    3. Things are Buzzing

    • Our Maturing Hives
    • Migrating Our Hives

    4. A Mid-season Break

    • Some Housekeeping
    • Packaged Bees and Queens
    • Bee Associations
    • Books and Periodicals

    Part II

    5. Diseases and Pests

    6. Its Harvest Time

    • Harvesting and Processing
    • Packaging and Selling

    7. Rounding Out the Year

    • Overwintering Our Hives
    • Second Spring Management

    8. The Year in Review

    • The Ten Commandments of Beekeeping
    • Africanized bees

     

    Introduction

    • A Brief History
    • Building Supers and Frames
    • Preparing Food Supplements and Medications

     

    Introduction: Section 1.1: Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040

     

    Introduction: Section 1.2: Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040

     

    Introduction: Section 1.3: Presented with permission of the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education. To purchase the complete "Honey Bees and Beekeeping" television series on DVD or accompanying book, please call 1-800-359-4040

     

  8. Bee Health Contents
  9. Native Bees
    Metallic sweat bee (Augochlora pura). Photo by Philip Moore. Credit: Sam Droege

     

          Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are but one species among thousands of different bees within the superfamily Apoidea. Honey bees are unique in their societal life cycle and storage of large food reserves; most bees are solitary, nest individually, and do not store surplus food. Honey bees are not native to America and were imported from Europe early on during colonization. Native bees have evolved with the existing flora and some have established intricate relationships with particular flowers. Conserving populations of native bees is important because they are valuable pollinators of many plant species, often performing pollination more effectively than honey bees.
          Understanding some of the characteristics of native bees will help foster a positive environment for all bees. Below are a few articles that will help explain a bit about native bees.

  10. Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae

    Nosema apis spores magnified 400X on a hemocytomer slide used for counting spores. Photo by Yuchuan Qin. Credit: Zach Huang

     

          Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are single celled parasites of the honey bee midgut that can weaken individual bees and entire colonies, making them more susceptible to other pests and diseases, as well as affect digestion, metabolism, hormone production, queen egg laying, homing and learning. Millions of spores can be found within an individual bee and spores will persist on beekeeping equipment. Nosema apis has been well known to the beekeeping community for the last century, while Nosema ceranae, which was formerly primarily found in Apis ceranae, has recently become widespread in western honey bee colonies.

          Although knowledge is limited on N. ceranae much of the characteristics of N. apis is shared. Differentiation between the two pathogens is only possible through laboratory techniques, but the life history, transmission, and treatment is much the same. Below are articles that will describe those characteristics. 

  11. Varroa Mites
    Varroa mites as seen under a microscope. Credit: Zach Huang

          Varroa mites (Varroa destructor) are the foremost pest of western honey bee colonies. They inhabit nearly every honey bee colony in most of the world, transmit deadly viruses, shorten bee lifespan, limit productivity, and cause severe economic damage every year. Maintaining Varroa populations in the hive below the economic threshold is a primary activity of beekeepers and eradication of the pest is unlikely any time soon.

          Below are articles that detail the life cycle and biology of varroa, monitoring and treatment options, selecting for resistant stock, and impact of varroacides in the hive. 

  12. Beekeeping Equipment

    A productive apiary with standard bee hive equipment on hive stands. Credit: The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright
     

         The modern bee hive was invented by the Reverend L. L. Langstroth, patented in 1852, after his monumental discovery of "bee space". Bee space describes the phenomenon that if a space less than 1/4 inch is left the bees fill it with propolis (a glue like substance produced from tree sap) and, when a space larger than 3/8 inch is left the bees fill it with comb. The majority of bee hives used today are still based on Langstroth's design.
          Given the narrow range of tolerance with bee space, hive components must fit together tightly to limit excess or too little open space. Each manufacturer may produce bee hives slightly differently and the combining components from different companies can cause minor problems. Careful research and experience with each company's components is important before investing in hive equipment. Below are articles to explain a few of the necessary hive equipment. 

  13. Frequently Asked Questions
    Two "expert" bee researchers ponder a quandary: "well, what do you think?" Credit: Zach Huang



     

          Beekeepers are almost by definition curious individuals. The nature of beekeeping, as with any environmental relationship, is complex. Even some of the most experienced beekeepers are confounded by the mysteries of a bee hive. That is what makes honey bee research a rewarding and never-ending journey.
          Below is a list of commonly asked questions and links to the best answer at the time it was asked. As more information becomes available, perceptions shift, and may render a formerly correct answer invalid. The following list is only a starting point and one should always seek a second opinion on any difficult or important subject. Local knowledge is especially important as geographical variables cannot be resolved in this universal forum. If your question is not listed below, consider using the Ask an Expert function.

     

  14. Webinars and Seminars
    A presentation at a honey bee conference. Credit:Zach Huang

          Researchers and other knowledgeable individuals commonly give presentations on their area of expertise, either at conferences or other smaller meetings. We try to record these seminars whenever possible to allow the widest audience for the presentation. Overtime some of the links to a seminar may be broken and unrecoverable, we will attempt to maintain an up-to-date list of our video content. Webinars and seminars that are recorded, archived online, and available for free can be found below. Other videos can be found on our YouTube channel.

  15. Advanced Field and Lab Techniques
    Artificial Insemination of a Honey Bee Queen. Credit: Courtesy The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright

          For the intrepid beekeeper, especially those with access to a microscope or laboratory, many diagnostic techniques are available. Investing in a decent quality microscope, particularly when shared by a beekeeping club, is a worthwhile endeavor.
          Below are methods for a few advanced techniques that may be appropriate for experienced beekeepers, while others should only be attempted by those with significant training. If these techniques are of interest but beyond the skill set of a beekeeper, training classes are available from many universities and beekeeping organizations. 

  16. Honey Bee Lab and Organization Links
    Male Melissodes bees apparently sleeping in a sunflower. Credit: Zach Huang

          Many government agencies, private interest groups, and universities in the US and around the world work to better understand and protect honey bees and other pollinators. Many of these groups offer diagnostic or other services in honey bee health, while others feature informative resources for beekeepers, growers, gardeners, and other stakeholders.
          Below is a selection of websites that offer compelling and trustworthy information or services in the areas of honey bee and pollinator health. 

  17. Citizen Science

    The European Wool carder bee (Anthidium manicatum). Credit:Courtesy The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright

          People all over the globe are discovering that their observations and local knowledge can be valuable to researchers investigating various ecological phenomena. Natural history groups in particular are reaching out to "citizen scientists" to help them collect data and the internet has opened up a world of communication between these groups.
         Because insects are common and easily observable, many contributions can be made without specialized knowledge or equipment. Below are a few links to articles describing groups who are reaching out for support from those who can donate their time, energy, and experience towards increasing scientific understanding.

  18. Queen Rearing and Bee Breeding

    A typical queen cell cup used in queen rearing. Credit: Courtesy The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright






     

         Queen rearing is the process of inducing a colony to produce new queens by manipulating various colony attributes. This can be accomplished by any experienced beekeeper, though most beekeepers purchase new queens from well established producers. Bee breeding is the selection of desirable traits over generations of queens and is only feasible by those with long-term commitment and significant expertise. Honey bee breeding programs in the U.S. are carried out by the USDA and university researchers who then distribute their unique strains of honey bee queens to bee producers, who integrate those traits into their breeding program. 
          Because queens mate with up to 15 drones, the distribution of genes in a honey bee hive is fairly diverse. This diversity translates into desirable features like pest and disease resistance and optimal foraging strategies, however, it also makes the process of selecting desirable traits more complicated. Below are resources to help the beekeeper understand various attributes of queen rearing and bee breeding, especially emerging research on improving domestic honey bee stock.

  19. Basic Beekeeping Techniques

    Beekeeper inspecting a brood frame. Credit: The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright

          Entering the world of beekeeping can be fun and challenging: many new terms must be understood; equipment, tools, and bees purchased; seasonal management practices researched; beekeeping clubs joined; trade magazines subscribed to; classes attended; and now is the time to learn some techniques.
          Understanding the basics of colony inspection and manipulation, monitoring for pests and diseases, producing honey, and preparing for winter are crucial to success and enjoyment with beekeeping. In addition to the many books and periodicals the beekeeper should have at their disposal, the following are articles that exhibit the basics of regular beekeeping tasks.

  20. Pesticides and Honey Bee Health

    Honey bee foraging on Borage. Credit: The Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera), Crown Copyright

          Pesticides are a class of chemicals or biological agent with properties designed to deter, kill, incapacitate, or otherwise limit damage by a pest. most pesticides are used to protect plants by targeting weeds, plant pathogens, insects, nematodes, or other damaging organisms. Pesticides use is widespread in modern agriculture and can be applied in many forms. The use of pesticides must follow label instructions and misuse can harm or kill a variety of non-target organisms. 
          Mitigating damage of pesticide use to honey bees is the responsibility of all parties involved and requires concerted effort to minimize the risk, especially If bees are kept in agricultural areas. The following articles will help you understand and limit the risk of honey bees to pesticide exposure.

  21. American and European Foulbrood

    Image: Brood infected with European Foulbrood. Photo by M.V. Smith. Credit: Zach Huang

          American and European Foulbrood are two different, yet similar bacterial diseases of honey bee larvae and pupae. The name comes from the location of first discovery and foulbrood describes the putrid smell of honey bee brood infected with these pathogens. American Foulbrood, although rare, is one of the only regulated honey bee diseases because of the virulent pathogenicity, ease of spreading the disease, and limited control measures. European Foulbrood is less severe and can be common. Both are treated with the same chemical, although recognition and differentiation is crucial to managing honey bee colony health.
          Below are articles that describe diagnosis of the disease, treatment options, and considerations to limit the impact of these pathogens. 

  22. Honey Bee Biology

    Image: Wax scales secreted between tergites of the honey bee abdomen. Credit: Zach Huang

           Honey bees are a fascinating model organism with a complex mating and inheritance system, highly evolved social behavior, dance communication language, and mutualistic interaction and evolution with flowering plants. All honey bees belong to the genus Apis and bees in this genus are the only species to store large amounts of honey and exhibit a perennial life cycle.
           The western honey bee (Apis mellifera) is native to Europe and has since been spread all over the globe. It is the primary honey bee of western civilization, while the eastern honey bee (Apis ceranae) is the counterpoint in eastern civilization. Below are pages that describe the biology, anatomy, morphology, sociology, and physiology of Apis mellifera.

     

  23. Wooden Components of a Modern Bee Hive

    Bee Space Is Important

    Traditional hive parts are made from wood. The design and dimension of hive parts are based on the concept of bee space. Bee space was first recognized and promoted by the Philadelphia minister Lorenzo Langstroth in the 1850s, when he introduced what is commonly known as the Langstroth hive. Langstroth discovered that bees build excess comb in a space larger than 3/8 inch. Bees will fill any space less than 1/4 inch with propolis. Therefore, a space between 3/8 inch and 1/4 inch is in a range of acceptable bee space, with 5/16 inch an average that is most acceptable by beekeepers. A Langstroth hive would have a 5/16- or 3/8-inch space separating each frame and the frames from all other hive parts.

    Parts of a Standard Hive

    A standard hive includes a bottom board, a hive body or two containing frames, several honey supers containing frames, an inner cover and an outer telescoping cover that fits on top. The terms “hive body” and “super” are functionally interchangeable. They are both basically wooden boxes. Normally the “hive body” refers to the larger box placed directly above the bottom board, usually associated with the brood production area. Supers are the boxes that are normally placed above. Supers are available in three sizes; a deep is the largest; a medium, also called an “Illinois,” of intermediate size and a shallow, the smallest size. Please see diagrams and figures illustrating these parts and their dimensions.

    Area for Brood Chamber and Supers

    Two deep or three medium supers are recommended as the best brood-rearing space. One deep and a medium could also be used and one deep plus a shallow would be the minimum amount of brood-rearing space. Four to six supers are usually required for honey production.

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Source: Skinner, Parkman, Studer, and Williams. 2004. Beekeeping in Tennessee. University of Tennessee Extension PB1745. 43p.

  24. Pollination Security for Fruit and Vegetable Crops in the Northeast

    Researchers work to make crop pollination sustainable in the Northeast

    Editor:Philip Moore, The University of Tennessee
    Last Edited: June 30, 2014

    The pollinator security project was initiated in 2011 to address a gap in knowledge with respect to pollinator communities in northeastern cropland.

    Reports of declining native pollinators, decreased availability of honey bee rental colonies, and general public misunderstanding led to the creation of this working group to produce a sustainable pollination strategy for stakeholders.

    The goal is to contribute to long-term profitability of fruit and vegetable production and the outcome is this webpage along with other farm training and publications to increase knowledge and adoption of practices that protect pollinator communities.

    One component of this project is video segments which highlight aspects of fruit or vegetable production in the Northeast. The first in this series focuses on commercial blueberry production in Maine and comes to you in seven parts.

    Part One: Commercial Blueberry Pollination in Maine's Blueberry Barrens

     
    Video Segments (titles without links are yet to be released):

    Part 1:  Commercial Blueberry Pollination in Maine's Blueberry Barrens
    Part 2: Lowbush Blueberry in Maine, Native Plants and Native Bees in a Modern System
    Part 3: Pollinator Plantings (The Bee Module) for Maine Lowbush Blueberry

    Part 4: Landscape Ecology in Maine's Blueberry Growing Region
    Part 5: How to Estimate Native Bee Abundance in the Field
    Part 6: Economics of Lowbush Blueberry in Maine
    Part 8: Grower Interviews and Research Topics in Lowbush Blueberry Pollination

    Specific objectives of this project are to : 

    1. Determine the contributions of pollinator communities and identify which site characteristics have the greatest influence on pollinator effectiveness in apple, lowbush blueberry, cranberry, and cucurbit.
    2. Develop hypotheis-driven model based on factors shown to affect pollination deficits.
    3. 
    Quantify pesticide residues in pollen and relate to crop and management strategies, and estimated risk to the bee community.
    4. 
    Assess shared parasite load between introduced and native pollinator communities.
    5. 
    Analyze the economics of pollination services and determine the value of pollination service.
    6. 
    Heighten our understanding of the grower community to understand why farmers accept innovation and to increase adoption of pollinator conservation measures.
    7. 
    Facilitate knowledge transfer allowing growers to both assess and improve pollination security.

    This content is produced by a group of researchers from across the northeast:

    Frank Drummond, The University of Maine
    Kimberly Stoner, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
    Dana Bauer
    Bryan Danforth
    John Burand, The University of Massachusetts

    Brian Eitzer, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
    Aaron Hoshide
    Cyndy Loftin
    Tom Stevens, The University of Massachusetts
    John Skinner, The University of Tennessee
    Dave Yarborough, The University of Maine
    Tracy Zarrillo, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station
    Sunil Tewari
    Ajanta De
    Kalyn Bickerman, The University of Maine
    Eric Asare
    Shannon Chapin, The University of Maine
    Eric Venturini, The University of Maine
    Sara Bushman
    Sam Hanes, The University of Maine
    Kourtney Collum, The University of Maine

    Michael Wilson, The University of Tennessee

     

     

    Funded by the USDA-NIFA Specialty Crops Research Initiative (SCRI)

     

  25. All Bugs Good and Bad 2014 Webinar Series

    Please join us for this webinar series for information you can use about good and bad insects.  Topics will include how you can help good insects like bee pollinators and how to control insects we think of as bad, like fire ants, termites, and new invasive insects.  Spiders and ticks aren't actually insects, but we will talk about them too. Webinars will be on the first Friday of each month at 2 p.m. Eastern time.  Click on the title for information on how to connect to the webinar.


    2014 Webinar Series:  All Bugs Good and Bad

    FEBRUARY 7, 2014

    If Flowers are Restaurants to Bees, then What Are Bees to Flowers?
    Presented by Dr. John Skinner
    Moderated by Danielle Carroll
     

    MARCH 7, 2014

    Straight Talk About Termites
    Presented by Dr. Xing Ping Hu
    Moderated by Mallory Kelley
     

    APRIL 4, 2014

    Get TickSmart: 10 Things to Know, 5 Things to Do
    Presented by Dr. Thomas N. Mather
    Moderated by Shawn Banks
     

    MAY 2, 2014

    Are Those Itsy Bitsy Spiders Good or Bad?
    Presented by Dr. Nancy Hinkle
    Moderated by Charles Pinkston

     

    JUNE 6, 2014

    Fire Ant Management
    Presented by Elizabeth "Wizzie" Brown
    Moderated by Gerald "Mike" McQueen

     

    AUGUST 1, 2014

    Minimize Mosquito Problems
    Presented by Molly Keck
    Moderated by Christopher Becker

     

    SEPTEMBER 5, 2014

    Kudzu Bug Takes Over the Southeastern U.S and Brown Marmorated Stinkbug -- All Bad
    Presented by Michael Toews and Tracy Leskey
    Moderated by Willie Datcher
     

    OCTOBER 3, 2014

    Alien Invasions, Zombies Under Foot, and Billions of Decapitated Fire Ants
    Presented by Dr. Sanford Porter
    Moderated by Nelson Wynn
     

    NOVEMBER 7, 2014

    Where Have All the Honey Bees Gone?  Hope for the Future
    Presented by Dr. John Skinner
    Moderated by Sallie Lee
     


    Download the flyer for the entire 2014 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series:  JPG  PDF


    The 2014 Webinars are brought to you by the following eXtension Communities of Practice:  Imported Fire Ants, Urban IPM, Bee HealthInvasive Species, Gardens, Lawns and Landscapes, and Disasters and by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

    Looking for 2013 Webinars?  Click here!